Real Talk about Ideal Customer Avatars

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So, if you’ve been around the business block for anytime now, you’ve probably come across the concept of an ideal customer avatar. If you’re new to the concept, an ideal customer is that person who you are dying to work with. It’s the person who you can serve right now, easily and effectively and who will delight in your product or services and hopefully, become a brand ambassador and spread the word about your business. Simply put, it’s your people.
The internet is filled with multiple exercises and worksheets to help you focus in on your ideal customer and get really clear on what your ideal customer wants, where they hang out, what magazines the read and lots of demographic information.
 
Audience Is Key
The bottom line is, you have to know who you are talking to. You have to know who you serve. You have to know your audience. Because, you are going to use your ideal customer to help you craft the style of your writing, the VOICE and TONE of your brand. Different audiences call for different levels of formality or slang. Different audiences will determine if you use sarcasm or not.
Not only that, but being really clear on who you are talking to guides the content that you write. When you know who you are speaking to, you can write about their exact pain points, you can clearly answer the questions they have at that stage of the journey, and you can position your business or service as the answer to those pain points. The more specific you get, the more effective your writing will be.
 
Ready for the Real Talk?
To be honest, I have mixed feelings about ICAs. I totally understand the theory that they can help you with understanding the content and style of your writing. But I’m more of a practical person. I find writing for a fictional ICA hard, because my imagination can take over and I see too many possibilities.
 
Instead, what I’ve found to be really effective, is to think of one specific person that I’ve already worked with, my favourite client. And I imagine sitting and talking to them.
 
What is this person struggling with that I know how to solve? What does this person need to hear at this stage in the journey? How can I be of service? I literally imagine sitting with them, what we would talk about (or have talked about) and then I use that to guide my writing.
 
And then I apply these two lenses: style and content. If I wouldn’t actually say the words to someone in a conversation, I sure as hell am not going to write them. 
 
And if it’s not something I would talk about, then it’s probably not the right topic for a post.
 
Picturing and writing for one person, makes writing content for your business a lot easier, whether it’s a blog post, email newsletter or social media. 
 
Just keep it real. 
What would you say to that one person? How could you help them and build their trust?
Then do that.
 
What questions do you have about writing? Shoot me an email, I’d love to help!
 
Happy Writing,
Becky

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